About Site Content

The copywrite for the technical content on this site is owned by the site authors.

Product-related site content ages with the evolution of technology in the marine market space.  This is particularly true of consumer electronics (including made-for-purpose marine electronics) and software applications.

Electrical power is so familiar and pervasive that we all tend to take it for granted, yet it accounts for a substantial percentage of the boat problems that boaters will encounter while cruising.  Electrical problems also account for a substantial percentage of fires, property losses and fatalities that occur in marina and boating venues.

This website places a heavy emphasis on boat electrical systems.  Few boaters have any background or training with the electrical power found in residential dwelling units in North America.  Even fewer have any background in the regulatory safety codes that guide the work of residential electricians and marine electrical technicians.

ALL READERS ARE ADVISED TO VERIFY THAT WHAT IS PRESENTED HERE IS  APPLICABLE AND APPROPRIATE TO THER PERSONAL SITUATION BEFORE BEGINNING ANY PROJECT WORK.  

ALL ELECTRICAL WORK SHOULD BE DONE WITH POWER OFF AND PHYSICALLY DISCONNECTED FROM THE SOURCE.

 DIYers ARE RESPONSIBLE TO KNOW AND ADOPT SITE, EQUIPMENT AND PERSONNEL SAFETY PROCEDURES.

Jim’s education and interests are in the area of electrical power systems, mechanical systems, industrial controls and computers.  This website is written to an audience of boaters (and RVers) on matters of interest specifically to that audience.

Boating puts all boaters in situations where getting home, or continuing a cruise, may depend upon the ability to resolve an issue without the help of a mechanic.  That means defining the problem, being able to perform repairs, and being able to do so safely.  All boat owners should be able to perform certain basic boat and engine maintenance tasks.  These tasks are fairly simple, and there will almost certainly be a time when a situation arises, presents the need, but a mechanic will not be available.  Whether or not you like to do mechanical work, there will be times when you have no choice and you will have to do at least some of these tasks without help.  Things like:

  1. add/change oil and change oil filter;
  2. change raw water pump impeller;
  3. add/change transmission fluid;
  4. add/change engine coolant;
  5. change engine zincs;
  6. change primary and secondary fuel filters;
  7. bleed fuel lines;
  8. add water to batteries;
  9. replace fuses;
  10. clear/replace automatic bilge pump float switch;
  11. tighten packing gland;
  12. bleed hydraulic steering system;
  13. clear a clogged toilet;
  14. replace joker valve;
  15. replace faucet washers/seals;
  16. clean out sea strainers;
  17. patch dinghy

Think of this like you thought about your kids when they learned to drive.  You may not expect them to rotate their tires, but you did teach them to change a flat tire.  Same principle here, and for the same reasons.

So, the primary  “target audience” for this website is readers with little prior technical background who primarily fall into two categories:

  1. a strong desire to “Do It Yourself,” or
  2. those needing to understand issues for the ability to define and explain problems, ask questions, and interpret answers and proposals when engaging paid professional service personnel.

On electrical topics, I try to write to an audience with little electrical background; “laymen.”  I try to “start at the beginning,” but in fact, some basic high school knowledge of things like voltage, current, resistance and Ohm’s Law is imbedded in almost all electrical discussions.  Feedback I get tells us readers like my articles, but must sometimes “read them more than once.”  Many times in my own engineering career, I have had to do that same thing.  It’s the way understanding is developed.

Readers with some prior background may find the site useful for “upgrading and expanding” their existing technical skillset.